Vintage czech art glass-New and Old Marks on Glass from Eastern Europe

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Vintage czech art glass

Vintage czech art glass

Vintage czech art glass

Vintage czech art glass

Vintage czech art glass

I am not sure if it was made by Moser, Kralik or a Czech competitor, but it appears to be Vintage czech art glass 20th C. Galaxy Art Glass Vase. Glsas was engraved with a vibrating electric pen. The enamel is all intact and the colors are bright but the gold trim around the rim is worn as shown in the picture. A wooden crate may be used for intercontinental shipments for maximum protection. Vintage czech art glass have interpreted Barolac labels as a trade name of Jenkins, but that does not appear to be correct. Both of these spots are shown in the closeup pictures and can barely be seen.

Striped satin sheet. New Products October - Czech / Bohemian Glass

VanBibber Antiques. Vintage czech art glass Glass. Some of these pieces can be easily confused with old att when they carry fake and forged marks. The glass was hand blown and has a rough pontil. Will be sure is bubble wrapped and secure for shipping. We stand behind Frank philipp nude products. Sort: Best Czdch. Pair of Harrach? They are both marked Hut Jakub. La Tresorerie. It has a brass silver plated mount Vintage czech art glass it, that has a beautiful open worked ornate scroll design. Antique Matchmaker. Antique Original. The Moser marks shown below are only some of the many marks the company used. The far simpler shades made ca.

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  • Czechoslovakia is a popular term with collectors.
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Collectors Weekly. Sign in. All Categories All. All Art Glass. American art glass. Bohemian art glass. British art glass. French art glass. Murano and Italian art glass. Scandinavian art glass. Loetz art glass.

Swarovski figurines. Tiffany art glass. Bohemian Art Glass Related Categories. Auction Alerts. Bohemian art glass was made in and around the present-day Czech Republic during the Art Nouveau or Jugendstil era. Decorative vases, cups, and pitchers were popular forms, and many of the pieces have an iridescent sheen from the firing and

Charlie's China is not responsible for such wear or manufacturer's imperfections. Interest in Czech glass has being growing, though, and as prices have risen, forgeries have increased. Gracefully curved with a unique top, the base glass is clear with a yellowish tinge at the base, and the lace details are in opaque white. Italian Murano Glass. Signed Halama with original labels.

Vintage czech art glass

Vintage czech art glass

Vintage czech art glass. New Products October

All Art Glass. American art glass. Bohemian art glass. British art glass. French art glass. Murano and Italian art glass. Scandinavian art glass. Loetz art glass. Czechoslovakia is a popular term with collectors. The name, first used as a mark after the country was formed in , appears on glass and porcelain,other decorative items and costume jewelry that was often marked on the spring rings in necklaces and bracelets.

Although Czechoslovakia split into Slovakia and the Czech Republic on January 1, , the name continues to be used in some trademarks. You can sort by any title. Click on any of the top titles to sort. In your inbox every Wednesday.

Home Price Guide Czechoslovakia Glass. Czechoslovakia Glass. Price Guide Listing for Czechoslovakia Glass.

Czech Art Glass Bowl by Josef Rozinek for Borocrystal for sale at Pamono

But that time period and those pieces represent only a fraction of the centuries-long tradition of glass making in Eastern Europe. Many products and glass making techniques from this region have changed little over the years.

Shapes, colors and styles of years ago are continuing to be produced. Some of these pieces can be easily confused with old especially when they carry fake and forged marks. Barolac is a mark found on a line of frosted glass made by the Czechoslovakian firm of Joseph Inwald, ca. Some original pieces are opalescent, as well as frosted. If marked, pieces usually have Barolac in molded cursive lettering. Other pieces are simply marked Czechoslovakia in molded block letters.

There is some confusion about the relationship between Barolac and the British merchant John Jenkins. Inwald glass will sometimes be found with paper labels having both Barolac and Jenkins' names. Some have interpreted Barolac labels as a trade name of Jenkins, but that does not appear to be correct. Inwald apparently did contract work for Jenkins and made certain specific items for Jenkins' exclusive use.

The nation of Czechoslovakia did not exist until the end of World War I. The country was formed in from Slovakia, Bohemia and Moravia. After the collapse of Communism in the early s, Czechoslovakia continued as one nation until January From and , many pieces of glass were marked "Czechoslovakia. It was founded in and made high quality art glass through Although the name Kralik does not appear on its glass, the company used a very distinctive "Czechoslovakia" mark, ca.

This mark appears as an arched acid stamp. Note that the two letter Os are split down the center. Robert and Deborah Truitt, Bohemian glass experts, estimate 60 to 70 percent of pieces with this mark are Kralik products 1. Until recently, it generally hasn't been worthwhile to forge marks on Czech glass because prices were relatively low. Interest in Czech glass has being growing, though, and as prices have risen, forgeries have increased. The best advice to avoid new marks is to never base your buying decisions on marks alone.

Design, color and details of construction are better indications of age, quality and Czech origin than marks. The iridescent glass known by his name was made at a glass factory started by his widow, Susanna, in The business began making common objects but turned to art glass in when Johann's grandson Maximilian Von Spaun II took control of the business.

Pieces made for export, if marked, usually read "Loetz, Austria. Before Loetz prices began rising in the s, many originally unmarked pieces of Loetz carried forged signatures of other makers like Tiffany or Steuben.

Now that Loetz prices equal or exceed those of other makers, earlier Tiffany and Steuben forgeries are being ground off and faked Loetz marks applied. A number of relatively low-value pieces by other makers have even had their authentic original marks removed and faked Loetz marks added. There are a couple of simple rules to keep in mind when examining suspected Loetz marks. Between the wars, ca. Two marks in particular—Czechoslovakia in an oval and Czechoslovakia in a rectangular box—have about a 90 percent probability of being Loetz, according to Robert and Deborah Truitt 1.

Permanent marks of any kind are virtually unknown on authentic production-grade Loetz iridescent glass shades. Virtually all original Loetz vases have fire-polished top rims and ground pontils on the base. Many iridescent look-alikes with forged marks have sheared top rims and no ground pontil.

The examples shown above were offered in a Butler Bros. These new products are frequently offered with forged marks of 19th and early 20th century makers. Made in Czechoslovakia, ca. The German spelling is Tschechoslowake. This is one of the few "Czechoslovakia" only marks that can be attributed to a specific company. Opaque bits of glass are worked into an internally swirled glass body. The surface has a highly iridescent "oil spot" surface. Ground pontil in base, fire polished smoothed at the furnace top rims.

Finding a shade marked Loetz, for example, would be highly unlikely and probably a forgery. The far simpler shades made ca. Lotz W WE Klostermuehle paper label only, never engraved. Fig The first type is high quality iridescent glass with ground pontils with the mark usually appearing in the pontil.

The other glass found with the oval mark is on a line Loetz called Tango. Tango was made in bright Art Deco colors, frequently red or orange, with applied edges and handles in contrasting colors, usually black.

Exact appearance varies. Marks on Loetz cameo may also include the mark of a glass designer. It is actually one of the names registered by Loetz, ca. Appears in raised glass. There is considerable variation in appearance among old marks. Loetz" in raised glass. Used ca. Both appear as raised glass marks, ca. Then a forged Loetz mark was engraved. It was engraved with a vibrating electric pen. Note the typical skips particularly in the letter Z.

All authentic engraved Loetz marks were applied with a wheel. The vast majority of all authentic engraved Loetz marks are wheel engraved. No authentic production-grade Loetz was rountinely marked with a diamond-tip device.

From upper left: Czechoslovakia in oval; Czechoslovakia in single line; Loetz Austria in script. Acid marks are easily forged and widespread in the market. Marks alone are never a guarantee of age or quality. The Richard mark above is on the new 6-inch cameo glass reproduction in Fig. Ludwig Moser founded several glass decorating studios in the middle of the 19th century and a glass factory in the early s.

From the s to , the Moser firm decorated blanks from other glass houses. Moser began making its own glass in , when Ludwig Moser's four sons were brought into the business. The business went bankrupt during the s and production was severely limited until the end of WW II in After the war, the company resumed production and remains in production today.

The Moser specialty was enameling for which it is best known but also worked with cutting and engraving as well as cameo and acid etching. Moser designs have spanned many different styles of decorating including Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Modernism. Forgeries of Moser marks are frequently applied to new glass as well as genuinely old but unmarked wares of other makers.

The Moser marks shown below are only some of the many marks the company used. Don't confuse this mark with the monogram of Kolo Moser, the glass designer see separate Kolo Moser listing. Earlier uses include acid-stamping and enamel. Karlovy Vary is Czech for Karlsbad. The person using this mark sells primarily through online auctions. The vast majority of items with this forged mark are inexpensive pressed wares, particularly modern versions of malachite, a jade-green colored glass.

The new malachite horse head above is made in America. The mark on the left has also been reported in diamond-tip script. His monogram, below, appears on some designs he made for Loetz, as well as independent work made from his designs at other firms. Usually appears as a raised glass monogram. Harrach is a Bohemian glass works founded ca. The so-called "propeller" mark, generally attributed to the English firm of Thomas Webb, is actually a Harrach mark.

Research by Robert and Deborah Truitt have positively traced the origin of the mark to Harrach family coat-of-arms. The Truitts have documented examples of the mark on various Harrach pieces as well as printed uses of the mark such as the label shown here. The "propeller" marks may be stamped or painted; usually found in black but occasionally in red. Forged propeller marks applied to pieces which are offered as Webb, are fairly common. This design was the basis for the so-called propeller mark, Fig.

Confirm Close. Barolac Barolac is a mark found on a line of frosted glass made by the Czechoslovakian firm of Joseph Inwald, ca.

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Vintage czech art glass