Canoe bottom paint polyurethane-Painting Fiberglass Canoe - Fishing - askderekscruggs.com

The paint on your boat is an important line of defense against all these things. Repainting your topsides is a big project, but at least it will give you a palette of colors. Photo by Doug Logan. A smooth application of bottom paint helps boat performance. Photo by Diego Yriarte.

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

All in all, I'd probably go the one-part route Canoe bottom paint polyurethane usually use Brightside. Check the westmarine. Mr Efficiency Apr 9, List I have so far sandpaper Bus std brushes and rollers paint or gelcoat? One and two part epoxies Canoe bottom paint polyurethane hard to apply without a sprayer. Sand it with the 80 grits. I would find a nasty-looking test section a couple square inches is probably plenty and dab a little bit of polyurethane varnish on it to see if it will do the job without any resin being added. I figured the bottom paint was like When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Unanswered Questions.

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Interlux Fiberglass Bottomkote NT Antifouling Marine Paint Interlux Fiberglass Bottomkote NT uses Canoe bottom paint polyurethane dual resin technology that provides a universal durable, fast dry antifouling paint that delivers the benefits of both hard and ablative antifouling You will need one or two tubs for an older canoe. Together, they cited 9 references. So the further from the object you are spraying the rougher the surface as it forms little balls instead of a Canoe bottom paint polyurethane atomized finer spray. When applied the VC17m will immediately give a hard, I guess, then, that it does not adhere real well, at ppolyurethane on a truck. Cookies make wikiHow better. Magnums playboy it up again with the hose, and use another cheesecloth for the dust. Interlux Micron Canoe bottom paint polyurethane Ablative Bottom Paint Micron CSC multi season ablative paint provides a controlled release of anti-fouling biocide at the paint surface and will not lose its effectiveness when the boat Cannoe hauled out of the water for extended periods He lives a few hundred yards behind me that makes it handy and he does a great job. Things You'll Need Electric sander if you don't already own an electric sander, you can borrow one. Wholesale Marine carries anti-fouling paintengine spray painttopside paint as well as painting supplies.

Discussion in ' Materials ' started by cestevespr , Dec 12,

  • Painting your own fiberglass canoe is a fun project.
  • It has been known for a long time that a 2-inch scratch on a smooth surface can generate turbulence for 10 or 12 inches as water flows over the scratch.
  • One part application, long lasting, and provides fantastic gloss retention.
  • The contents of the Alaska Outdoors Supersite forums are viewable by anyone, and may be read by clicking the forum headings below.

It has been known for a long time that a 2-inch scratch on a smooth surface can generate turbulence for 10 or 12 inches as water flows over the scratch. If you have an older canoe, its bottom is probably no longer smooth. First use a grit sanding sponge or palm sander with purple 3M-type paper to clean the bottom.

Then get out the glazing compound. You can find it at www. You will need one or two tubs for an older canoe. Use the plastic putty knife that comes with the glazing compound right out of the tub with no mixing and fill in all your nicks on the bottom.

The glazing does not need to be perfectly flat because it sands easily to flush it up with the existing canoe bottom. Allow the glaze to harden for about 1 hour and sand off with a sponge or palm sander.

Then repeat until the bottom is smooth. Next seal the canoe bottom. You want to use a great non-stick coating like that used on cookware.

Cookware coatings are based on the largest molecule known, one that has a lower drag coefficient than ice. This type of coating was first developed by DuPont and marketed under the name Teflon. Use blue tape to mask off the water line. A good technique is to just pour a little urethane on the bottom and then wet the roller, spreading the urethane out as thin as possible.

By the time you get to the end of the canoe, you probably can start over with your second coat. If you see some bubbles as you go, just roller over again to break them. After two coats about cc of material , let it harden for 5 hours, sand off problems, and do your final coat. If drips over the mask or on the side of the canoe occur, just wipe off with thinner while the urethane is still wet.

Note that you should get your final coat on within 10 hours of the first coat to assure good adhesion. If you get any orange peel or if the bottom is not as smooth as you like, get out that wax orbital buffer and some light rubbing compound to smooth down to that perfect glass finish.

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Of course a lot could have changed in the last year. For paint, removal of the vinyl, scrupulous surface prep, and professional application of high quality automotive or marine paint would add a bit of hardness. Don't get stuck without it! Lightly sand it again with a grit sanding sponge. The areas that are not sanded have a better chance of peeling off.

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane

Canoe bottom paint polyurethane. The Alaska Outdoors University is now open!

It was just a fishing boat to him, so I doubt that he bought anything other than this. The boat is trailered, so antifouling is not an issue and I don't need an antifouling "bottom" paint.

Is it OK to use several coats of a good quality polyurethane enamel on this boat? It seemed to hold up OK for the previous owner. Any advice much appreciated! Re: Polyurethane floor paint for boat? You could use Easy Poxy Petit one part polyurethane. It is very good and was the best of 8 brands tested in a boating magazine.

I used it on boat sole and it out lasted a very expensive marine enamel by Z spar. It lasted 3 years of daily livaboard use with work boots. Fishermen use stuff that is a reasonable price and works well. I would usually ask a fisherman or livaboard before i talked to any yachties. I've used poluyrethane porch and floor enamel on a few day-use boats and haven't had any problems.

It doesn't seem to go on as smoothly when rolling and tipping as Brightside or Easypoxy do, but the difference is usually just a bit of slight orange-peel texture, which doesn't bother me all that much. I'll go for the paint on the restored canoe! Superb job! Thanks to all for the advice and validation.

Now I'm off to get the first coat on her I've a slightly different take of this. If this is a surface one is going to walk or stand on, non skid is a good quality for it to have. I have used it for several years now, and it seems to work just fine. I did find that different brands work better then others, right now I am using Rhoda quick drying floor poly paint. One other trick: Have them add a bit of Blue and a spot Black die to the paint; some stores call it 'ultra White' package.

It will take some of the yellow cast out of the paint and give a brighter 'White' look. Cullen T. I should say, it is much less scratch resistant than Petit epoxy-paints, but a hell of a lot cheaper, and easier to sand back for the next coat. Had one terrible experiment with ACE brand polyurethan. Did not bond properly to the wood, and immediately fell off spots where traces of the previous coat of enamel was still present.

I'll echo what some others said- don't use polyurethane if you want a high quality yacht finish. Perfectly fine for commercial or relaxed rec usage. Sand and prep that surface properly! Awl-grip is probably the best paint in the world, but will kill you if you apply it wrong.

Use caution, plan ahead, borrow somebody who has done it before. I too highly recommend Petit Easypoxy for a one part paint. Short of 2 part polys it is the best paint we've used.

We have used it for the last yrs, since scaqmd banned Monopoxy. Not as durable as Awlgrip, but much cheaper and easier to apply. We have as well switched from Awlgrip to Awlcraft At a very small loss of durability, you get the ability to sand and polish.

Awlcraft cures the same throughout its depth and can be polished to remove sags, orangepeel dirt bugs or overlap marks from repair blendings. It kept its gloss well into the second season. Remarkable paint, easy to work with. You want to use a great non-stick coating like that used on cookware. Cookware coatings are based on the largest molecule known, one that has a lower drag coefficient than ice. This type of coating was first developed by DuPont and marketed under the name Teflon.

Use blue tape to mask off the water line. A good technique is to just pour a little urethane on the bottom and then wet the roller, spreading the urethane out as thin as possible. By the time you get to the end of the canoe, you probably can start over with your second coat. If you see some bubbles as you go, just roller over again to break them.

After two coats about cc of material , let it harden for 5 hours, sand off problems, and do your final coat. If drips over the mask or on the side of the canoe occur, just wipe off with thinner while the urethane is still wet. Note that you should get your final coat on within 10 hours of the first coat to assure good adhesion. If you get any orange peel or if the bottom is not as smooth as you like, get out that wax orbital buffer and some light rubbing compound to smooth down to that perfect glass finish.

Click images to enlarge. Smooth Sailing, Inc.

Painting a Fiberglass Canoe | Canadian Canoe Routes

Discussion in ' Wood and Canvas ' started by hopkintoncedar , Jul 11, Log in or Sign up. WCHA Forums. Our family has an 18 foot Old Town Fiberglass canoe built in as the "show" canoe for the boat shows during the bicentennial year, with a red, white, and blue flag pattern. When we picked up the boat in Old Town, they referred to the boat as the "Americanoe".

I am going to tackle a restoration of this boat this year and I have a couple of questions for those who might be familiar with fiberglass restoration work. The finish on the outside is pretty faded and shot at this point. I am going to "map" out the pattern, then sand, fill, and re-paint to replicate the original design. What would be the best paint to do this with from a durability standpoint?

I am going to mask and spray. On the inside of the boat, the epoxy has worn out pretty substantially on the floor of the boat, exposing the fiberglass fibers to the point that when you use the boat, your bare feet get itchy! After wet sanding and cleaning the bildge with solvent, would the fix here be to brush in a coat or two of thin epoxy resin?

Thanks for any help! I suppose the first thing to do would be to make sure that the gelcoat can't be buffed out. Old Town used a rather thick layer of colored gelcoat polyester resin mixed with pigments and a bit of filler on the outside of the boats. It oxidizes on the surface, but there may be enough there to wet sand it up through the grits up to the 2, grit range removing the dead stuff and then buff it out. In the process, deep scratches could be filled as needed. Gel coat sometimes gets small cracks in it which usually don't really hurt anything, but whether or not you want to live with them, fill them with new gel coat tedious or fix them with filler and paint over them would depend on how bad they are.

If the old gel coat is too far gone to bother messing with, then some filler and a fresh paint job may be a better option. There are pre-mixed epoxy fillers like "Quick Fair" available or you can mix your own with resin and filler powders.

Clean out the dings, over-fill them slightly and then sand the entire hull smooth. It has enough tooth for good paint bonds, yet will be smooth enough to give a nice finish and good gloss. One-part marine enamels like Interlux "Brightside" or Petit "Easypoxy" will yield a surface that has similar gloss to the original gel-coat and they're fairly easy to apply sprayed, or rolled-and tipped out with a brush.

The drawback to them is that they respond to running over rocks like any enamel will, and scratch fairly easily. You also don't want to leave the boat sitting in the water for several days straight as enamels will peel. If you figure that like any canoe, it will probably get some scratches on the bottom but the rest won't get much abuse and will stay looking good for a long time, then these enamels might be a good bet. The two-part, linear-polyurethane enamels Sterling, Awlgrip, Interthane, etc.

If you spray them, you have to have a hood with piped-in air to breathe and essentially should be wearing something that looks like a space-suit.

There really isn't much of a fudge-factor with these paints when spraying as they can actually kill you. All in all, I'd probably go the one-part route I usually use Brightside. For the inside, I doubt you'll really need to go the epoxy route unless you have damage that needs to be repaired. On exposed weave, it's tough to get a nice thin coating.

I would find a nasty-looking test section a couple square inches is probably plenty and dab a little bit of polyurethane varnish on it to see if it will do the job without any resin being added. For the same weight and thickness of a single layer of rolled-on epoxy you could probably brush four coats of varnish or clear coat and spray eight or ten. I suspect that a couple coats of varnish or auto-clear-coat, brushed or sprayed will do all the sealing that you need.

We used to get pretty good life on strippers by leaving some weave in the bottoms for traction and just varnishing it with the same varnish we were using on the outside of the hull.

It was decently tough, easy to re-coat if needed and provided an adequate barrier between bare feet and the raw fiberglass.

Todd Bradshaw , Jul 11, Although if you spray, an automotive 2 part urethane would hold up fairly well. They spray real nice, very forgiving and I think they go on much nicer than the interlux brightside. I cant get the interlux to cooperate, although it may be pilot error! I don't know what Brightside is like to spray. I have three spray guns but seldom use them on boat stuff. Considering the amount of dust clean-up that would need to take place in the room before attempting a spray job on a boat where you're blowing compressed air all over the place, it just never seems worth it to me.

I' go for the "vacuum the floor and walk carefully while rolling and tipping the paint" approach. Brightside does roll and tip extremely well and I've done it to several boats, including this one which was done out in the gravel driveway of the place I used to live.

I mixed some black and some green to get the color I wanted, but the paint was unthinned Brightside right out of the can.

Well, if you paint anything like you write books Todd, I'm not arguing with ya!!!! I gotta say, that sail rig book is a work of art!!! Anyhow, I tried to tip brush brightside, then tried Kirbys with Penetrol sp and liked it better. So, are you coming to Peterborough? You must log in or sign up to reply here. Show Ignored Content. Share This Page Tweet. Your name or email address: Do you already have an account? No, create an account now.

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Canoe bottom paint polyurethane